Women’s Dreaming

This dreaming tells about women’s ceremony. It affirms womens place in Warlpiri society.  The Dreaming story marks large tracks of land of which women are guardian over.  Particular men are workers for the women. They are called kurdungurlu.  This works in reverse as well, where the particular women work for particular men. Only the women know this dreaming. It talks about travelling from north to south, west to east into the new sun signifying a new day and new life.  They teaching all the young kids. They all teach people from different skin groups, so that the dreamings are passed along to the young children.

$620.00

1 in stock

Medium: Painting
850 x 500mm Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen
Year: 2021
SKU: 319-21

Description

This dreaming tells about women’s ceremony. It affirms womens place in Warlpiri society.  The Dreaming story marks large tracks of land of which women are guardian over.  Particular men are workers for the women. They are called kurdungurlu.  This works in reverse as well, where the particular women work for particular men. Only the women know this dreaming. It talks about travelling from north to south, west to east into the new sun signifying a new day and new life.  They teaching all the young kids. They all teach people from different skin groups, so that the dreamings are passed along to the young children.

Additional information

Weight 0.8 kg

About Biddy Yulngarri Long

Nungarrayi is a traditional woman bringing years of bush living and travel by foot and later in life vehicle to her painting. Her early life was with other Warlpiri on Mt Doreen cattle station when her family wasn't travelling around their lands.  She has worked for many years teaching Warlpiri language and culture to children in the school's bilingual education program. Her initial medium was ochre when painting onto the body for ceremonies, and she still practices this, as well as painting with acrylic onto canvas and linen. Nungarrayi delights in the variations of colours now available to her. Her sister Lily Nungarrayi Jurrah/Hargraves was also a committed artist and they often painted at this art centre together. Nungarrayi began painting in 1986 in Lajamanu after a TAFE course introduced the community to Acrylic and Canvas. Biddy Nungarrayi was using the surname Jurrah, but wants to now use Long from her husband that has long since passed away.  Nungarrayi's art has been widely exhibited in Australia and is held in major national collections.

See other works from Biddy Yulngarri Long